Parsley

Parsley, growing parsley, how to grow parsleyHow to Grow Parsley:

The Greeks liked to use parsley, but not in their cuisine. They decorated their tombs with it. Hercules was said to have chosen it for his garlands, and it was woven into their crowns of the victors at the Isthmian Games. The Romans also made garlands from parsley for banquet guests to wear around their neck, which was supposed to discourage intoxication. It also worked well to mask strong odors.

Planting and Growing:

Parsley, parsley facts, how to grow parsley, Parsley takes a very long time to germinate, up to 30 days, and should be started indoors 8 weeks before the last frost. To speed up the germination process, first soak the parsley seeds in warm water for 24 hours before sowing them. This softens the seed coat, allowing water to reach the embryo inside faster. Do not allow them to soak longer than 24 hours.
Transplant parsley when at least two true leaves develop 2 to 3 weeks after the last frost date. Parsley can stand some shade, and can be planted near other taller garden plants, like tomatoes. Allow for at least 6 inches (15 cm) of spacing between each plant.
Parsley does not need much water but does have shallow roots, so water evenly and spread 3 inches (7 cm) of mulch around the plants to keep the soil moist. Fertilize when the plant reaches about 4 inches (10 cm), and then again a month later.

Harvesting and Preserving:

Start harvesting parsley when the plant is large enough that clipping stems and leaves will not affect the plant. Start with small clippings on the outside leaves. New growth comes quickly, but if you need a large harvest, clip what you need and then fertilize to encourage new growth. Parsley is a biennial in most climates, and will go to seed in its second year. If you allow the plant to grow the next season, make sure to harvest the leaves before the flowers open.
One way to extend parsley’s growing season is to carefully dig up the plant in the fall and transplant it into a 10” (25 cm) pot. Place it next to a window, which receives full sun for winter harvesting.
Parsley will not last long in the refrigerator. To preserve parsley it can be frozen or dried. To freeze parsley, simply wash the sprig of leaves and put them in the freezer in plastic bags. To dry, place the sprigs of parsley in a dehydrator or conventional oven at 110 degrees F (43 degrees C) for 8-10 hours until it easily crumbles, and then crumble and store in a glass jar.

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One response to this post.

  1. […] The Greeks liked to use parsley, but not in their cuisine. They decorated their tombs with it. Hercules was said to have chosen it for his garlands, and it was woven into their crowns of the victors at the Isthmian Games. The Romans also made garlands from parsley for banquet guests to wear around their neck, which was supposed to discourage intoxication. It also worked well to mask strong odors. See more: http://thegardenerspot.com/plant-eycyclopedia/parsley/ […]

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